inferrable


inferrable
infer VERB (inferred, inferring) deduce from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements.
DERIVATIVES inferable (also inferrable) adjective.
USAGE On the use of imply and infer, see the note at IMPLY(Cf. ↑imply).
ORIGIN originally in the sense «bring about, inflict»: from Latin inferre 'bring in, bring about' .

English terms dictionary. 2015.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • inferrable — inˈferable (also / fûrˈ/), inferrˈable or inferrˈible adjective That may be inferred or deduced • • • Main Entry: ↑infer …   Useful english dictionary

  • Common law — For other uses, see Common law (disambiguation). Common law (also known as case law or precedent) is law developed by judges through decisions of courts and similar tribunals rather than through legislative statutes or executive branch action. A… …   Wikipedia

  • Matriarchy — Gynecocracy redirects here. For the pornographic novel, see Gynecocracy (novel). Matriarch redirects here. For other uses, see Matriarch (disambiguation). Part of a series on …   Wikipedia

  • African American Vernacular English — African American topics History  Atlantic slave trade · Maafa Slavery in the United States Military history of African Americans …   Wikipedia

  • Cleft sentence — A cleft sentence is a complex sentence (one having a main clause and a dependent clause) that has a meaning that could be expressed by a simple sentence. Clefts typically put a particular constituent into focus. This focusing is often accompanied …   Wikipedia

  • Pro-drop language — Linguistic typology Morphological Isolating Synthetic Polysynthetic Fusional Agglutinative Morphosyntactic Alig …   Wikipedia

  • coherentism — Theory of truth according to which a belief is true just in case, or to the extent that, it coheres with a system of other beliefs. Philosophers have differed over the relevant sense of cohere, though most agree that it must be stronger than mere …   Universalium

  • infer — verb (infers, inferring, inferred) deduce from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements. Derivatives inferable (also inferrable) adjective Origin C15 (in the sense bring about, inflict ): from L. inferre bring in, bring about …   English new terms dictionary

  • -able — able, ible 1. general. These two suffixes are derived from Latin endings abilis and ibilis, either directly or through Old French. Of the two, able is an active suffix that can be freely added to the stems of transitive verbs, whereas the set of… …   Modern English usage

  • -ible — able, ible 1. general. These two suffixes are derived from Latin endings abilis and ibilis, either directly or through Old French. Of the two, able is an active suffix that can be freely added to the stems of transitive verbs, whereas the set of… …   Modern English usage


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.